You’ve got a presentation to deliver, your nerves are shot and you look like a wet dishrag. Excessive sweating is a real problem and a dead giveaway that you’re overanxious. It could be just a bad case of nerves or indicate a real medical problem called hyperhidrosis. Either way, it’s embarrassing when sweat glands kick into high gear. So, what’s a guy to do?

Knowing a few tips about personal hygiene, which fabrics to wear and what foods to avoid will help keep it under control.

Tips To Help Lessen Excessive Sweating

 

USE ANTIPERSPIRANT

Let’s get to the basics. Which do you need—a deodorant or antiperspirant? A deodorant fights only odor. It smells pretty but doesn’t do much to combat sweat. An antiperspirant contains aluminum to block the skin’s pores and plug up the sweat glands. Some antiperspirants contain deodorants but deodorants do not contain antiperspirants.

When choosing an antiperspirant, look for one that is “clinical” strength. You’d be surprised at how many are available! Shower at night then apply it—you’ll be less active and sweat will be reduced. Excessive sweating increases with daily activities so morning applications will wash away more quickly. Of course, don’t be afraid to reapply it during the day and keep a spare at work.

WEAR DRY-WICK ACTIVEWARE

It’s perfectly normal to work up a sweat at the gym. In fact, it’s practically a badge of honor! Fortunately, clothing manufacturers are now using lightweight breathable fabrics that wick away moisture from the skin. Sometimes referred to as “technical” activeware, synthetics such as nylon and polyester blend with a stretchy material such as Lycra to maintain their shape.

On the other hand, natural fibers absorb moisture and are best for less vigorous workouts. Go for 100% cotton, a cotton blend or soft, chemical-free bamboo. Either way, workout clothes should be washed inside out then tumbled dry to preserve bright colors and graphic prints. Tie loose strings from sweatpants so they won’t get tangled in the wash.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT SHIRTS

Whether you’re on the job or heading out for an evening of fun, the last thing you want to deal with is underarm sweat. Wearing a cotton undershirt will absorb sweat, keeping it close to your skin and away from your shirt.

Be a master of disguise and wear dark shirts or shirts that have prints or patterns. They won’t reveal underarm sweating as readily as solid colored shirts. In warmer weather keep your body cooler with a loosely woven fabric such as linen—it will allow moisture to flow through the weave. Steer clear of silk, as it tends to cling and make you feel hot.

To get rid of those nasty pit stains, pre-soak undershirts for at least one hour in a mixture of one part each baking soda, peroxide and water. Scrub if necessary.

SWEATY FEET?

Shoes trap moisture and provide the perfect breeding ground for bacteria, fungus and odor. Wash your feet with antibacterial soap, dry them thoroughly, then sprinkle on a little foot powder.

Athletic socks can be made of moisture-wicking synthetics or merino wool. You would expect wool to be itchy and hot but merino wool is quite comfortable and very absorbent.

As for athletic and casual footwear, shoes topped with mesh readily allow feet to breathe. Be sure to allow them to air out, just as you would a sweater or suit. And, slip into sandals or flip-flops if weather permits.

Excessive sweating still out of control?

Here are a few more things to try:

• Splash cold water on your face throughout the day to cool down your body temperature.
• Skip spicy foods—they stimulate nerves which actually makes you feel warmer!
• Sip ice water and eliminate the caffeinated drinks.
• Go for low-sodium foods and drinks. Excess salt means your body has to sweat to eliminate it.
• Shave your armpits. You may think it’s not a manly thing to do but bacteria causing odor loves hair.

If you are diagnosed with hyperhidrosis, you may be prescribed a super strength antiperspirant but watch out for skin irritation. The next step to treat excessive sweating would be Botox injections in your armpits. Although costly, it’s one way to immobilize sweat glands for several months.

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